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Education
Gender Equality
Child Mortality
Maternal Health
HIV/AIDS, other diseases
Environment
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Poverty

 

Population below $1 a day is the percentage of the population living on less than $1.08 a day at 1993 international prices (equivalent to $1 in 1985 prices, adjusted for purchasing power parity). Poverty rates are comparable across countries, but as a result of revisions in PPP exchange rates, they cannot be compared with poverty rates reported in previous editions for individual countries. (World Bank)

Poverty gap at $1 a day is the mean shortfall from the poverty line (counting the nonpoor as having zero shortfall), expressed as a percentage of the poverty line. This measure reflects the depth of poverty as well as its incidence. (World Bank)

Percentage share of income or consumption held by poorest 20% is the share that accrues to the lowest quintile of the population. (World Bank)

Prevalence of child malnutrition is the percentage of children under five whose weight for age is less than minus two standard deviations from the median for the international reference population ages 0 to 59 months. The reference population adopted by the WHO in 1983, is based on children from the United States, who are assumed to be well nourished. (World Health Organization)

Proportion of population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption Data not yet available.

 
 
 

Education

 

Net primary enrollment ratio-is the ratio of the number of children of official school age (as defined by the national education system) who are enrolled in school to the population of the corresponding official school age. Primary education provides children with basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills along with an elementary understanding of such subjects as history, geography, natural science, social science, art, and music. Based on the International Standard Classification of Education, 1997 (ISCED97). (UNESCO Institute for Statistics)

Percentage of cohort reaching grade 5-is the share of children enrolled in primary school who eventually reach grade 5. The estimate is based on the reconstructed cohort method. (UNESCO Institute for Statistics)

Youth literacy rate-is the percentage of people ages 15-24 who can, with understanding, read and write a short, simple statement on their everyday life. (UNESCO Institute for Statistics) 

 
 
 

Gender equality

 

Ratio of girls to boys in primary and secondary education-is the percentage of girls to boys enrolled at primary and secondary levels in public and private schools. (UNESCO Institute for Statistics)

Ratio of young literate females to males-is the percentage of females to males ages 15-24 who can, with understanding, read and write a short, simple statement on their everyday life. (UNESCO Institute for Statistics.)

Share of women to men in wage employment in the nonagricultural sector-is the share of female workers in the nonagricultural sector (industry and services), expressed as a percentage of total. Industry includes mining and quarrying (including oil production), manufacturing, construction, electricity, gas, and water, corresponding to divisions 2-5 (ISIC revision 2) or tabulation categories C-F (ISIC revision 3). Services include wholesale and retail trade and restaurants and hotels; transport, storage, and communications; financing, insurance, real estate, and business services; and community, social, and personal services-corresponding to divisions 6-9 (ISIC revision 2) or tabulation categories G-P (ISIC revision 3). (International Labor Organization)

Proportion of seats held by women in national parliament-is the percentage of seats held by women in national legislative assemblies. The number of seats refer to both elected and appointed members. (United Nations, Women's Indicators and Statistics Database)  

 
 
 

Child mortality

 

 Under 5 mortality rate-is the probability that a newborn baby will die before reaching age five, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates. The probability is expressed as a rate per 1,000. (United Nations Statistics Division’s Population and Vital Statistics Report; country statistical offices; Demographic and Health Surveys and the United Nations Children’s Fund’s (UNICEF) State of the World’s Children 2000)

Infant mortality rate-is the number of infants dying before reaching one year of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year. . (United Nations Statistics Division’s Population and Vital Statistics Report; country statistical offices; Demographic and Health Surveys and the United Nations Children’s Fund’s (UNICEF) State of the World’s Children 2000)

Children immunized against measles-are the percentage of children under one year of age who received measles vaccine. A child is considered adequately immunized against measles after receiving one dose of vaccine. (World Health Organization and United Nations Children’s Fund)

 
 
 

Maternal health

 

Maternal mortality ratio-is the number of women who die during pregnancy and childbirth, per 100,000 live births. (Demographic and Health Surveys, the World Health Organization's Coverage of Maternity Care (1997) and other WHO sources, the United Nations Children's Fund, and national statistical offices)

Births attended by skilled health staff-are the percentage of deliveries attended by personnel trained to give the necessary supervision, care, and advice to women during pregnancy, labor, and the postpartum period, to conduct deliveries on their own, and to care for the newborns. (World Health Organization)

 
 
 

HIV/AIDS

 

Prevalence of HIV, female-refers to the percentage of females ages 15-24 who are infected with HIV. (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS [UNAIDS])

Contraceptive prevalence rate-is the percentage of women who are practicing, or whose sexual partners are practicing, any form of contraception. It is usually measured for married women ages 15-49 only. (Surveys-such as Demographic and Health Survey or Living Standards Measurement Study-from national sources)

Number of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS-is the estimated number of children at the end of 1999 who have lost their mother or both parents to AIDS before age 15 since the epidemic began. Some of the orphaned children included in this cumulative total are no longer alive; others are no longer under age 15. (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS [UNAIDS])

Incidence of tuberculosis-is the estimated number of new tuberculosis cases (pulmonary, smear positive, extrapulmonary). (World Health Organization)

DOTS detection rate-is the percentage of estimated new infectious tuberculosis cases detected under the directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) case detection and treatment strategy. (World Health Organization)

 
 
 

Environment

 

Proportion of land area covered by forest-is land under natural or planted stands of trees of whether productive or not, as percentage total land area. (Food and Agricultural Organization)

Nationally protected areas-are totally or partially protected areas, as the percentage of total land area, of at least 1,000 hectares that are designated as national parks, natural monuments, nature reserves or wildlife sanctuaries, protected landscapes and seascapes, or scientific reserves with limited public access. The data do not include sites protected under local or provincial law. (World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Protected Areas Data Unit)

GDP per unit of energy use-is the PPP GDP per kilogram of oil equivalent  of commercial energy use. (International Energy Agency)

Carbon dioxide emissions per capita-are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include contributions to the carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. (Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in the U.S. state of Tennessee)

Access to an improved water source-refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling. (World Health Organization and United Nations Children's Fund, Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000 Report)

Access to improved sanitation facilities-refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate excreta disposal facilities (private or shared, but not public) that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained. (World Health Organization and United Nations Children's Fund, Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000 Report)

Proportion of people with access to secure tenure-Data not yet available.

 
 
 

Partnership

 

Net official development assistance (ODA)-consists of disbursements of loans made on concessional terms (net of repayments of principal) and grants by official agencies of the members of DAC, by multilateral institutions, and by certain Arab countries to promote economic development and welfare in recipient economies listed as developing by DAC.  Loans with a grant element of at least 25 percent (calculated at a rate of discount of 10 percent) are included in ODA, as are technical cooperation and assistance.  Data are presented as a percentage of GNI.  (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

Proportion of ODA to basic social services-is aid reported by DAC donors for basic health, education, nutrition, and water and sanitation services.  (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

Proportion of ODA that is untied-is the share of ODA that is not subject to restrictions by donors on procurement sources.  (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

Proportion of exports admitted free of duties and quotas-is the value of exports of goods (excluding arms) received from developing countries and admitted without tariffs as a share of total exports from developing countries. (calculated by World Bank staff using the World Integrated Trade Solution)

Simple mean tariff-is the unweighted average of the effectively applied rates for all products subject to tariffs. Agricultural products comprise plant and animal products, including tree crops but excluding timber and fish products. Textiles and clothing include natural and man-made fibers and fabrics and articles of clothing made from them. (World Bank staff estimate using the World integrated Trade Solution system)

Total support to agriculture-is the value of subsidies to the agricultural sector. (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

Proportion of ODA provided as debt-relief-is the share of aid from DAC donors going to debt relief. (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

HIPC decision point-is the date at which a heavily indebted poor country with an established track record of good performance under adjustment programs supported by the IMF and the World Bank, commits to undertake additional reforms and to develop and implement a poverty reduction strategy. (The World Bank)

HIPC completion point-is the date at which the country successfully completes the key structural reforms agreed at the decision point, including the development and implementation of its poverty reduction strategy. The country then receives the bulk of debt relief under the HIPC Initiative, without any further policy conditions.  (The World Bank)

Unemployment rate of 15 to 24 year olds-refers to the share of the labor force without work but available for and seeking employment among people ages 15-24. (International Labor Organization)

Fixed line and mobile telephones-are telephone lines connecting a customer’s equipment to the public switched telephone network and portable telephones subscribing to an automatic public mobile telephone service using cellular technology that provides access to the public switched telephone network, per 1,000 people. (International Telecommunication Union)

Personal computers-are self-contained computers designed to be used by a single individual. (International Telecommunication Union)

 
 
 

General indicators

 

Total population-is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country of asylum, who are generally considered part of the population of their country of origin. (World Bank staff estimates from various sources) 

GNI (formerly GNP)-is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country and the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States).(World Bank national accounts data, and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development National Accounts data files) 

GNI per capita (formerly GNP per capita)-is the gross national income, converted to U.S. dollars using the World Bank Atlas method, divided by the midyear population. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country and the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). (World Bank national accounts data, and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development National Accounts data files.)  

Adult illiteracy rate-is the percentage of people ages 15 and above who can, with understanding, read and write a short, simple statement on their everyday life. (UNESCO Institute for Statistics) 

Total fertility rate-represents the number of children that would be born to a woman if she were to live to the end of her childbearing years and bear children in accordance with prevailing age-specific fertility rates. (World Bank staff estimates from various sources) 

Life expectancy at birth-indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life. (World Bank staff estimates from various sources including the United Nations Statistics Division's Population and Vital Statistics Report, country statistical offices, and Demographic and Health Surveys from national sources) 

External debt-is debt owed to nonresidents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services. Total external debt is the sum of public, publicly guaranteed, and private nonguaranteed long-term debt, use of IMF credit, and short-term debt. Short-term debt includes all debt having an original maturity of one year or less and interest in arrears on long-term debt. (World Bank, Global Development Finance)

Investment-consists of outlays on additions to the fixed assets of the economy plus net changes in the level of inventories. Fixed assets include land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. Inventories are stocks of goods held by firms to meet temporary or unexpected fluctuations in production or sales, and "work in progress." According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. (World Bank national accounts data, and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development National Accounts data files)

Trade-is the sum of exports and imports of goods and services measured as a share of gross domestic product. (World Bank national accounts data, and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development National Accounts data files)

     
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